Winter aid projects for internally displaced Afghans get underway

Shelter Now is distributing food to 20,000 people who have fled their homes inside Afghanistan.

31. January 2018


The Afghan refugee children are really happy to receive food from Shelter Now.

The Afghan refugee children are really happy to receive food from Shelter Now.

Kids in a Chalou Camp are thankful for the food. They don't need to beg in the streets this winter.

Kids in a Chalou Camp are thankful for the food. They don't need to beg in the streets this winter.

Internally displaced families in Afghanistan are in urgent need of help from Shelter Now

Hundreds of thousands of people in Afghanistan have fled their homes – to escape militants, poverty or for other reasons. They have fled to relatively safe parts of the country where they often live in tents or makeshift huts that they’ve managed to put together themselves. The men and teenagers – often the children too – try to pick up odd jobs to earn an income where they can. But it’s never really enough.

Particularly in winter, the situation can become life-threatening. Every day, the temperatures are well below freezing.

One people group that is particularly needy are the "Chalou". They live on the margins of society and are despised by many. They receive help from almost no one. They don’t even expect help, and are therefore especially grateful if they happen to get anything.

Over the years, Shelter Now has helped many internally displaced people get through the winter in various parts of the country.

Another positive side-effect of this kind of assistance is that it helps people to stay in their home country rather than seeking to flee to the West out of extreme need and desperation.

During Christmas Shelter Now distributed food to 750 Chalou families.

When the Shelter Now-team came into the Chalou camp the people were so excited because most of them have been waiting for any possible help from foreign agencies and NGOs. They said that the help is very timely because winter time is the most difficult for them.

A young teenage boy approached the SNI project manager and he said that his father was killed last year for defending the Chalou people. He further said, “Thank you for coming here and for helping us. My Father believed that we need to take a stand and not let anyone to look down on us. It cost his life, but I am proud of him. I almost lost hope after his death, but when you came it reminded me that we need to not give up, because God will send His people who will help and care for us. Thank you for loving us even though we have nothing here to offer to you.”